we all looked up

to read a synopsis about this book on Goodreads, click here.


Well, this was a great book besides that ending, which I shall mention later. It got a lot more deep then I thought it was going to be, considering it’s about four teenagers. These teenagers get crazily philosophical with long paragraphs about the meaning of life and death. But I suppose that is bound to happen considering the end of the world is happening for them. I just wish those long paragraphs had gotten broken up into more manageable paragraphs.

What I really liked about this book is that there are four POVs and they all overlap in someway. I liked that because when one event happened that involved two of them, you got to hear from both sides of the story. Not a lot of books can pull that off and this one did it well. It didn’t seem repetitive to me, which is good because otherwise that would have ruined the whole book.

As much as I liked the characters, I found that I couldn’t bond with them all per se. I think each of them was very unique but at the same time, very cliche. We have Peter, who is the jock who is trying to be more than that. There is Eliza, a photographer and the slut of the school. Andy is the burnout going nowhere but he has a heart of gold. Lastly, there is Anita, whose parents demand she succeed and get into Ivy League schools but all she wants to do is sing. Each brought something to the table in terms of the plot but they felt very cliched at times.

I think that is what stopped me from giving this book a full five stars. I liked the characters but couldn’t connect with them. I was also really incredibly disappointed with the ending. But I think this book brings out a good point, which is to live each day as if it was your last. You legit never know when the end is coming so tell that human you love them and pet your dog extra because by tomorrow, you could be gone. Simple as that.

 

xxlacy

boy meets boy

to read a blurb about this book on Goodreads, click here.


For such a short novel, this was incredibly impactful and made my heart happy. I had no idea what I was going to be getting into it. I had only seen a few reviews and they were meh at best. Normally, I shy away from 200 page novels. I find that they just don’t have enough meat. By the time I get into the story, it’s over. There isn’t enough time for character development or anything like that. I usually just ended up disappointed.

I experienced none of that with this book. Within its short 200+ pages, I got a sense of who everyone was and how the played a part in Paul’s life. No character was just there for the sake of being there. There was no filler, which is good. Because with a 200 page novel, filler would have destroyed it. Everything that was done, was done with reason. I loved that. I hate it when things happen for no reason.

What I loved so much about this book was how accepting everybody was. Paul was accepted for who he was right away. The high school Paul attended was just so chill. The town he lived in was open and accepting. I mean, it was so incredibly. If only we could live in such a wonderful place. What this book offered for a setting is seriously a dream that I wish we could make happen.

Paul, as a character, was good and I connected with him well. I do find it hard to connect to teenage boys because well…I’m not a teenage boy. I liked how he knew himself and made no apologies for it. He is simply just a normal teenage boy trying to make it through high school and the changes it brings, like losing friends and finding new loves. I thought he handled everything that was thrown his way remarkably well. He truly just wanted to do the right thing for everybody and I can’t find fault in that.

I hope that everybody takes a couple hours (because that’s how long it took me. Your results may vary) and read this book. Sure, it takes place in a pretty unrealistic setting but who doesn’t love a feel good coming of age story? I know I sure do!

 

xxlacy

lock and key

to read a blurb about this book on Goodreads, click here.

 

When I started this book, I was worried that I had finally outgrown Sarah Dessen. I used to read her books constantly when I was younger. They spoke to me because they were about problems that teenagers dealt with. I felt like I could relate to them. And in a way, I did. Even if the teenagers were whiny and cried a lot. I was a whiny teenager that cried a lot so I felt like I had a lot in common.

But I wondered, would I be able to relate to Sarah Dessen now that I am 24 years old?

In some ways, yes, I have outgrown Sarah Dessen. But in other ways, no. This book didn’t really help me decide but I enjoyed it anyway. But I wasn’t super wowed by it. I’ll explain further.

What I really liked about this book is the character growth. That is what really sucked me in. Every single character, whether it was a side character or a main one, had some sort of growth. And I love that. I hate it when characters are stagnant in a book. How can they accomplish anything if they don’t grow?

Ruby, I think, had the most amount of growth. She had been sent to live with her sister after her landlords found out that she was living alone, underage. Her flaky mother took off and left Ruby to fend for herself. Ruby had a bit of bad relationship with Cora, her sister, at first. She accused Cora of leaving her in the mess and abandoning her and her mom. But the truth slowly comes out and suddenly Ruby’s world isn’t the same. She had to learn what it meant to have a family.

The growth that Ruby had was incredible. She started out as a teenager so angry and sad for being left and completely set on being independent. Ruby’s mother instilled a lot of really bad thoughts in Ruby and it took her a long time to get over that. She viewed help as a sign of weakness and vowed to never left anybody help her. Slowly, through the help of Jamie (her brother in law), Cora, Nate, and others, she learned that help isn’t so bad and that family can mean more than one thing.

Nate was a good side character and a good love interest. I wasn’t totally wowed by him but he had charm and was good for Ruby. He made Ruby question a lot of her decisions in life and that was good for her. Nate essentially forced Ruby to rethink what it means to have friends and people that care about you. In turn, Ruby taught Nate that help is okay and it’s okay to talk about what is going on in your life.

Overall, this was a good book. I was surprised to find that I liked it as much as I did. I think the reason I didn’t love it was because I wasn’t super emotionally involved with the plot. It took me way longer than it should have to finish this book and I think it was just because I didn’t connect with the plot very well. In all honesty, there really wasn’t a plot and the plot I did find, kind of plodded along slowly. Maybe it would have helped if I didn’t read Harry Potter during this book but probably not. Overall, not a bad piece of work by Sarah Dessen.

xxlacy